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Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Hell House lot going on the market

Posted 12/31/69

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – The lot where Hell House once stood – considered hallowed ground by Southern Rock fans – will soon be on the market.

The lot inside the gated Edgewater Landing …

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Lynyrd Skynyrd’s Hell House lot going on the market


Posted

GREEN COVE SPRINGS – The lot where Hell House once stood – considered hallowed ground by Southern Rock fans – will soon be on the market.

The lot inside the gated Edgewater Landing development off County Road 315B is the community’s last undeveloped piece of undeveloped property. Depending on who buys the lot, the land where Lynyrd Skynyrd spent years writing and practicing many of their iconic hits will be developed.

The house got its name because it had a tin roof and lacked air conditioning. But it’s where songs like “Free Bird,” “Gimme Three Steps,” “Tuesday’s Gone” and “Sweet Home Alabama” were created.

Clay Today learned a realtor is working on getting the lot listed at 3353 Southern Oaks Dr. According to the Clay County Property Appraiser’s Office, the lot is valued at $225,000.

When the lot was originally on the market, Adam Hardle, a standup comedian and one-time student assistant in the video department for head coach Steve Spurrier at the University of Florida, bought the land because he remembered an interview founding Lynyrd Skynyrd member Ronnie Van Zant gave about “the concrete creeping in.”

“I didn’t want this special place to be some dude’s backyard,” Hardle said.

Hardle also was the man who introduced Tim Tebow to Urban Meyer.

But Hardle died unexpectedly of natural causes on Nov. 30. He was 41.

One Home Owner’s Association member worked feverishly to keep the band’s fans away from the property. He helped convince the state to drop its plan to designate the property as a historical landmark, telling the state since the community was gated, there wasn’t public access to the land.

But there was. Equally important as the spot where Hell House once stood was “Ronnie’s dock” on Peters Creek. It’s a place that inspired several of Van Zant’s songs. Hardle paid to have a historical marker placed at the creek, which has public access. The marker couldn’t be seen from the street.

According to the court, the man improperly had the marker removed without a judge issuing an order or the sheriff’s office delivering an order. The sign was eventually recovered, but it required help from law enforcement.

Apparently, the constant bickering from a handful of people may have been too much. So it will be sold.

According to county records, Hardle’s nonprofit, The Great Church Inc., bought the lot for $285,000 on Sept. 10, 2021.