This week in history 12/1/22

Posted 11/30/22

Five years ago, 2017

• The Clay County Agriculture Fair wins two first-place awards for its Little Red Barn and its partnership with the Farm-City luncheon at the International Association of …

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This week in history 12/1/22

Posted

Five years ago, 2017
• The Clay County Agriculture Fair wins two first-place awards for its Little Red Barn and its partnership with the Farm-City luncheon at the International Association of Fairs and Expositions.
• St. Leo University opened its education center at the Oakleaf Town Center.
• Britney Sigmon, of Jacksonville, is arrested after Clay County Sheriff’s Office deputies discover chemicals to make methamphetamine in her hotel room in Orange Park.

10 years ago, 2012
• State Attorney Angela Corey prepared for the retrial of Michael Renard Jackson after the Florida Supreme Court struck down his death sentence for the rape and murder of Andrea Boyer in 2007 at an Orange Park veterinary clinic.
• Oakleaf Village fourth grader Chase Newton wins $1,000 from Bonnie Plants after he grew a 17-pound cabbage.
• The county commission agrees to spend $40,331 to establish the Northeast Florida Regional Transportation Commission.

20 years ago, 2002
• According to the Clay County Department of Health, a Clay County man is diagnosed with the West Nile virus.
• Crews start to demolish the Qui Si Sana Hotel in Green Cove Springs to make room for the new city hall.

• Seamark Ranch is awarded an $11,725 grant by the Community Foundation.

30 years ago, 1992
• Challenger Ameila Geisenburg defeated incumblet Jack Raliegh, 95-85, for Seat 5 on the Keystone Heights City Council.
• The Green Cove Springs City Council votes to extend a curfew for six months after police chief Gail Russell attributed a drop in crime to the ordinance.
• The Board of County Commissioners establish a disposal fee of 55.21 a ton at Rosemary Hill and Keystone Heights convenience centers.

40 years ago, 1982
• Leon Hazelwood is elected president of the Clay County Cattleman’s Association.
• Robert Raines applies for a heliport permit to land helicopters at Bryon Road.
• The Green Cove Springs City Council move forward to condemn six dilapidated properties.


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