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Paul Wane’s guitar solo leads to ‘whirlwind’ of opportunities

Musician’s Rising Star Foundation donates music studio to AMIkids Clay County

By Don Coble don@claytodayonline.com
Posted 1/18/23

FLEMING ISLAND – Paul Wane is used to being on stage and in the spotlight. But he’s equally at home talking with children about playing music.

Wane gained national notoriety with a blistering …

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Paul Wane’s guitar solo leads to ‘whirlwind’ of opportunities

Musician’s Rising Star Foundation donates music studio to AMIkids Clay County


Posted

FLEMING ISLAND – Paul Wane is used to being on stage and in the spotlight. But he’s equally at home talking with children about playing music.
Wane gained national notoriety with a blistering rendition of “The Star-Spangled Banner” ahead of the Jacksonville Jaguars-Tennessee Titans final regular-season game. His guitar solo instantly went viral and made the local musician a star.
“I probably slept three or four hours the week after I played (at the game),” Wane said during a stop at Clay Today last Monday. “We’re making the most of it. A lot of important people are calling me now. It’s flattering. It’s very humbling. To know that they even know my name is incredible.”
Wane felt at home in front of 70,000 fans at TIAA Bank Field and millions watching ESPN on Jan. 7, but he was more comfortable talking with boys at AMIkids Clay County Wednesday about music. Wane’s Rising Star Foundation was responsible for donating more than 200 instruments to local children before the game. The support – including a $10,000 donation from Morgan and Morgan – will help Wane expand his platform.
“This last week, a man named Joshua (Grant), who's the Director of Education for AMI Clay County school, called and said his kids wanted me to come out and be a guest speaker there,” Wane said. “Like I said, with the help of Jay Murphy (who refurbishes donated guitars for Rising Star children), we're going to be able to donate a music room to these kids – guitars, amplifiers, drums, PA system, the mixing board, the whole thing and set up a situation where they can learn the trade of music where you know some got some of the kids can learn to be sound engineers. Some kids can learn how to work for a production company as roadies and technicians, and some can learn to be musicians and singers.
“I try to keep the phones and the game controllers out of their hands so that they can use their little minds to be creative.”
AMIkids is an organization that works with boys who’ve had trouble with schoolwork and behavior. AMIkids provides mentorships to give them positive alternatives.
Wane is the frontman for his band Duval County Line and the Paul Wane Experience, and most of his shows are based in Clay County. He’s a regular every Thursday night at the Howlin Wolf Bar in Melrose and considers Boogerville Hideout as one of his favorite venues.
Morgan and Morgan invited Wane to play at their tailgate party before last week’s Super Wild Card game against the Los Angeles Chargers. That’s when he was surprised by the richest gift to his foundation.
“I’ve only been to two Jaguars games and they won them both,” Wane said. “Last week was crazy because everyone recognized me. I couldn’t get a soft drink and peanuts. These last couple of weeks have been a whirlwind.”
Wane’s popularity now allows him to be more selective with play dates for DCL. They can pick when and where they play instead of accepting every gig to remain relevant.
“We have big things coming up,” he said.
Including his foundation.
“You know, we just gave a guitar to a girl and she said her father got one from us a few years ago,” Wane said. “That’s the first time we’ve had a second-generation donation.”
Wane said the idea to steer children toward music and away from the distractions of electronic games and the temptation to abuse drugs and alcohol always will be the biggest focus of his life.
“I started giving away guitars when I was a kid. I've been doing this my whole life,” he said. “It was ingrained in me when my uncle gave me my first guitar when I was 8. So I was always a mover and a shaker as a kid, you know mowing yards and finding ways to make money. I earned my allowance. I just wanted to be a singer, but I was so a high-strung, annoying little kid I couldn't find anyone that wanted to accommodate me. So I had to learn how to play an instrument so I can sing.”